Winning Business Plan Executive Summary Presentation Tips

A winning executive summary must have great content. However, perhaps equally important is a unique and captivating appearance. However, most business plan writers fail abysmally on appearance. In general, the appearance is predictable, boring, and standard. At the same time, the writer can’t risk creating something that doesn’t have a strong business feel. For many striking this balance is a nightmare or more accurately not even a possibility. In the next few paragraphs we’ll cover a number of conceptual examples that in part or together will deliver:

CONCEPT #1

Borders on the executive summary section will set your executive summary apart from the competition. My favorites are the very narrow triple line border or the broad line with either one or two narrow lines around the document. Also a dark bold black, deep blue or teal solid border from 1/4 to 1/2 inch around each page of the summary.

CONCEPT #2

1 to 3 graphics, illustrations, or photos with color on each page of the executive summary give character. Vary the size and spread across the pages. The graphics, illustrations and photos should not be gratuitous. They have to contribute to the summary in a strong positive way.

CONCEPT #3

I have found the two column format very compelling. You can often compress two pages of material to a single impactful sheet with a sense of being an easy read and yet a impactful presentation.

CONCEPT #4

Use bold type to highlight key information items in the executive summary.

CONCEPT #5

Brevity is powerful. Restrict your summary to a single page. Deliver a brief summary that tells the investor what you need from him or her. Explain clearly how your project is differentiated and will succeed. Explain what the risks are. Explain how the risks are mitigated. Deliver a clear explanation of what the anticipated returns will be.

CONCEPT #6

Lines to separate sections of your summary. Using lines can be physically attractive, very business like, and add to the message.

The writer can use these ideas in any combination that suits their needs, their message and their creative objectives. When writing a business plan executive summary, the main issues are to remember your audience. Consider who they are likely to be, what their background is, and what their goals are. Next, remember your goals and try to align those with your audience’s interests. The more effectively you tie these together along with creating a strong positive impact the more successful your executive summary will be.

Negotiating Events Out Clauses

Time and again, I have witnessed numerous organizations lose substantial amounts of monies because they failed to pre- negotiate numerous clauses, that are often key to substantially protecting the organization’s interests. Over my career in event planning, negotiations, and organizing, which now spans over more than thirty years, I have continuously tweaked and adapted my contract demands, in order to assure these protections. Those areas that have often caused the greatest agony for organizations are: limiting/ amending attrition clauses; addressing audio- visual expenses; protections regarding food and beverage areas; protections because of economic downturns, wars, or acts of God (weather, etc.); negotiating in modification and give- back dates; and, specific language regarding the ever- expanding tendency of many resorts to add on mandatory fees and service charges.

1. The strict attrition clauses of the past must never be permitted in a negotiated contract. The best way to address this is in advance, via a tersely and properly written and crystal clear Request For Proposal (R.F.P.). It is essential that group’s negotiate out or down attrition (i.e. not meeting certain specific numbers) either outright, or by instituting a substantial compromise/ outright reduction, or by being given flexible give-back dates (where the group can return rooms and reduce other targets, without penalty).

2. Audio- visual costs are often the great eye- openers to non- professional event organizers. These costs often escalate dramatically, often to the disbelief of amateurs. Professional negotiator first reduce substantially the audio- visual fee schedule, negotiate certain comps and allowances, and get in writing, in detail, all specific costs in this area, written in plain English descriptives.

3. Organizations must put in a clause regarding economic downturns, and the possible implications. Good negotiators have clauses regarding stock markets substantial drops, energy/ transportation substantial increases, acts of God (weather, war, terrorism, etc). Again, these clauses must be specific, and permit substantial givebacks if these parameters occur.

4. Giveback clauses must be included. These clauses are capable of protecting both the vendor as well as the organization, because it permits givebacks (and thus eliminates penalties, etc.) at three specific times (I recommend at 90 days out, at 60 days out, and then the final revision permitted at 30 days out, by specific percentages).

5. Many hotels today, observing the airline model, have instituted certain resort fees and service charges, in an attempt to promote an attractive hotel room rate, while collecting additional revenues. This has varied substantially from property to property, and, it is not unusual for the room rate promoted and the amount paid per night (adding in taxes, fees and service charges) to differ by thirty percent, or even more. Negotiators should have any fees that will be charged spelled out in detail, and a clause stating that the only fees the group will pay are those stated. In addition, negotiators should look closely at what these fees are for, because often what is included are not things that a large percentage of the group will either utilize or find of value. One area today that many surveys indicate are most resented in terms of fees, are substantial charges for internet access. With many properties today including or, at least, substantially reducing the cost of internet access, attendees often feel ripped off by excessive fees in this area. When a hotel says their service charge includes domestic local and long distance service, most attendees today find that of little value because most calls are made by their own cell phones anyway, and they rarely use these phones. Hotels that promote their spas as a reason to come to that hotel should not be charging fees for basic services, such as locker room access, saunas and hot tubs, or exercise equipment. It is appropriate, however, for them to charge additional for more advanced services such as massages, salons, classes, etc. Again, negotiators must carefully negotiate appropriate language into the initial contract.

Beware that it always easier, less stressful, more efficient, and fairer to all, to pre- negotiate in all of the above areas, and more. Failure to do so often leads to negative financial ramifications.

Marketing On The Internet – Do Not Lose Online Money With Poor Writing Presentation

You have probably heard the saying “content is king”. This saying is as true now as it was when it was first used. In fact, with the growth of the Internet, content has become more important. But the saying should be changed to “good content is king”. There is a huge amount of content being spread through the Internet that is not all good. Most of it comes down to poor writing presentation.

When you are marketing on the Internet, there is a lot of pressure to get content out there, but posting sub-standard material filled with misspelt words and grammatical errors, does not really present a website, product or service in the best possible light. In fact, it detracts from it. Here are some ways to help you make sure the content you are presenting will get your message across more effectively and help to make you online money.

Does It Make Sense?

If what you have written does not make sense, who is going to read it? Most people will not persevere. They will simply stop reading and move on to something easier. You may have spent a lot of time on keyword research to get a heading that catches attention so people want to find out more, but you will lose them if they find it too hard to understand. They do not have to spend time trying to make sense of your writing when they can so easily move on to someone whose writing is easy to understand.

To be certain it makes sense, leave it for a few hours after you have written it and return with fresh eyes. Read it through others’ eyes or get someone else to read it and ask them what message you are trying to convey.

Is It Easy To Read?

Will a reader have to plough through long, poorly-written sentences and paragraphs to dig out the points you are trying to make? Will they bother to do that? They might, if you have caught their attention with your heading and it is something they really want to know, but why make it hard to do that? Most will become frustrated and disappointed and will look somewhere else for the information. The trouble is they will probably not come back, as they will remember the bad experience.

We are in the digital age, which means people have a short attention span and browse content quickly until they find something that interests them. If it does not hold their attention they will move on.

Do You Really Care?

Sloppy writing sends a strong message to your readers: you do not really care about what kind of experience they have reading your material. Worse still, they get the impression that you think anything will do and they can please themselves whether they read it or not. Maybe it is a numbers game – if they do not read it, someone else will. To some extent it is a numbers game but make the numbers work for you by not turning most people away with poor writing presentation.

You do not have to be the best writer on the Internet but you do need to try to make sure your readers have a pleasing experience. That way you will have more chance of getting your message across and of getting them to return.

Good article or post presentation is rather like dressing for a date or a job interview: you dress up to please and impress the other person. You can approach your writing in the same way. If you are marketing on the Internet, you are not writing to please yourself. You are writing to please and impress your readers so they will listen to what you have to say and hopefully do what you want them to do. And guess what? By dressing up to make others feel good about you, you invariably feel good about yourself.